Thousands enjoy Beatherder’s unique vibe

Connor Part and Megan Cracknell

Christina Cornberg has her Beatherder tattoo done

Thousands enjoy Beatherder’s unique vibe

First published in East Lancashire

IF you’re able to catch a pagan wedding, witness bright young things dancing on old cars, and a Manchester icon belting out his version of Madonna’s Like A Virgin, Beatherder must be here again.

Others may have compared Sawley’s annual gathering to a mini-Glastonbury, and there was enough mud spattered across Dockber Laithe Farm to entertain that theory.

But the three-day gathering in the countryside more closely resembled 60s-era Woodstock, with extra hippy stalls and international cuisine thrown in.

Now in its ninth year, Beatherder has always set the bar slightly askew, with its blend of eccentric programming and niche platforms for very different performers, under the banner of ‘beats and barminess’.

Within the same acre, the bass barely stopped in The Fortress, a cross between a tin shed and Samurai palace, the more sedate Perfumed Garden, Stumblefunk tent, and the Maison D’Etre lounge, offering either guitar heroes or comedy, with Patrick Monahan headlining.

Like previously, the woods appeared to attract the real oddballs, with a Wild West street recreated and a car-bonnet disco side-by-side.

First-timer Jon Maughan, 32, from Chorley, said: “There is a mix of older hippy types, here for the vibe, and younger ones, for the dance tents.”

Stephen Livesey, 31, of nearby Brinscall, added: “I’d definitely think about coming again – it’s just different. We’ve met people from all over the place, Halifax, Burnley, Warrington.”

Headliners Happy Mondays, James Lavelle and 2ManyDJs were well-received but the likes of Boney M and late-breaking special guests like ABC and Badly Drawn Boy, complete with Madonna encore, kept things suitably weird.

Much has been made of the festival’s avowed rejection of corporate branding and backing – though at £7 for a paella and £5 for a ‘rasta’ dog, someone was making money somewhere.

But if, like Barnoldswick couple Sally Wharton and Martin Hall, you want to get hitched inside a stone circle, then make way for the festival’s own ‘Grand National’ – 15 runners in rubber horse masks doing laps – Beatherder deserved to be the sell-out success it was.

Comments (19)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

3:23pm Mon 21 Jul 14

The Seagull has landed says...

Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources.
The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.
Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources. The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better. The Seagull has landed
  • Score: -52

4:08pm Mon 21 Jul 14

hasslem hasslem says...

The Seagull has landed wrote:
Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources.
The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.
diddums! could you not get to sleep in your stoops hovel?
[quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources. The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.[/p][/quote]diddums! could you not get to sleep in your stoops hovel? hasslem hasslem
  • Score: 18

5:14pm Mon 21 Jul 14

over-worked says...

The Seagull has landed wrote:
Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources.
The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.
My family and I went and what a fantastic time we had. As for over stretching emergency services bet they are put under more pressure when the big football tournaments are taking place. All we saw were lots of happy people having fun and generally having a good time. So what if some people take drugs .what are you scared of? The sooner prohibition of cannabis is ended the better as many countries have done. No we are not lazy scroungers who started on pot and now are addicts. We work hard in responsible jobs pay our taxes have in the past volunteered for organisations , help old ladies and pick up other people's litter from outside our home yet in the eyes of the law we are criminal. The more happy gatherings the better .
[quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources. The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.[/p][/quote]My family and I went and what a fantastic time we had. As for over stretching emergency services bet they are put under more pressure when the big football tournaments are taking place. All we saw were lots of happy people having fun and generally having a good time. So what if some people take drugs .what are you scared of? The sooner prohibition of cannabis is ended the better as many countries have done. No we are not lazy scroungers who started on pot and now are addicts. We work hard in responsible jobs pay our taxes have in the past volunteered for organisations , help old ladies and pick up other people's litter from outside our home yet in the eyes of the law we are criminal. The more happy gatherings the better . over-worked
  • Score: 35

5:26pm Mon 21 Jul 14

Shorty Medlocke says...

The Seagull has landed wrote:
Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources.
The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.
Were you forced to go? Have you ever been? Has this festival affected your life in a negative way? No...I didn't think so. You stick to your idea of fun, and let others do what they want to do. One thing you can't call the Beatherder is anti social - it's a great social occasion. Don't be so judgemental.
[quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources. The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.[/p][/quote]Were you forced to go? Have you ever been? Has this festival affected your life in a negative way? No...I didn't think so. You stick to your idea of fun, and let others do what they want to do. One thing you can't call the Beatherder is anti social - it's a great social occasion. Don't be so judgemental. Shorty Medlocke
  • Score: 20

5:32pm Mon 21 Jul 14

GracesDad says...

Shorty Medlocke wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources.
The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.
Were you forced to go? Have you ever been? Has this festival affected your life in a negative way? No...I didn't think so. You stick to your idea of fun, and let others do what they want to do. One thing you can't call the Beatherder is anti social - it's a great social occasion. Don't be so judgemental.
His idea of fun is slagging people off on here for having different views to his own.

Complete moron that has obviously got several accounts as he keeps getting banned for being a total bellend.
[quote][p][bold]Shorty Medlocke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources. The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.[/p][/quote]Were you forced to go? Have you ever been? Has this festival affected your life in a negative way? No...I didn't think so. You stick to your idea of fun, and let others do what they want to do. One thing you can't call the Beatherder is anti social - it's a great social occasion. Don't be so judgemental.[/p][/quote]His idea of fun is slagging people off on here for having different views to his own. Complete moron that has obviously got several accounts as he keeps getting banned for being a total bellend. GracesDad
  • Score: 7

5:48pm Mon 21 Jul 14

Interocitor says...

Yep, he's a troll and 5hit one at that.
Yep, he's a troll and 5hit one at that. Interocitor
  • Score: -5

6:05pm Mon 21 Jul 14

greenscreener says...

Interocitor wrote:
Yep, he's a troll and 5hit one at that.
An excellent comment, brief, amusing and above all, accurate !
[quote][p][bold]Interocitor[/bold] wrote: Yep, he's a troll and 5hit one at that.[/p][/quote]An excellent comment, brief, amusing and above all, accurate ! greenscreener
  • Score: 3

8:44pm Mon 21 Jul 14

Rich Riley says...

GracesDad wrote:
Shorty Medlocke wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources.
The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.
Were you forced to go? Have you ever been? Has this festival affected your life in a negative way? No...I didn't think so. You stick to your idea of fun, and let others do what they want to do. One thing you can't call the Beatherder is anti social - it's a great social occasion. Don't be so judgemental.
His idea of fun is slagging people off on here for having different views to his own.

Complete moron that has obviously got several accounts as he keeps getting banned for being a total bellend.
Officer Seagull obviously had his rest day cancelled to patrol this and he's not happy!!
[quote][p][bold]GracesDad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shorty Medlocke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources. The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.[/p][/quote]Were you forced to go? Have you ever been? Has this festival affected your life in a negative way? No...I didn't think so. You stick to your idea of fun, and let others do what they want to do. One thing you can't call the Beatherder is anti social - it's a great social occasion. Don't be so judgemental.[/p][/quote]His idea of fun is slagging people off on here for having different views to his own. Complete moron that has obviously got several accounts as he keeps getting banned for being a total bellend.[/p][/quote]Officer Seagull obviously had his rest day cancelled to patrol this and he's not happy!! Rich Riley
  • Score: -1

9:00pm Mon 21 Jul 14

The Seagull has landed says...

hasslem hasslem wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources.
The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.
diddums! could you not get to sleep in your stoops hovel?
No, you're mum wouldn't stop pestering me for some action.
I kept telling her that 35 stone elderly women with a moustache and speed bag arm fat aren't my cup of tea.
[quote][p][bold]hasslem hasslem[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources. The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.[/p][/quote]diddums! could you not get to sleep in your stoops hovel?[/p][/quote]No, you're mum wouldn't stop pestering me for some action. I kept telling her that 35 stone elderly women with a moustache and speed bag arm fat aren't my cup of tea. The Seagull has landed
  • Score: -6

9:06pm Mon 21 Jul 14

The Seagull has landed says...

over-worked wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources.
The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.
My family and I went and what a fantastic time we had. As for over stretching emergency services bet they are put under more pressure when the big football tournaments are taking place. All we saw were lots of happy people having fun and generally having a good time. So what if some people take drugs .what are you scared of? The sooner prohibition of cannabis is ended the better as many countries have done. No we are not lazy scroungers who started on pot and now are addicts. We work hard in responsible jobs pay our taxes have in the past volunteered for organisations , help old ladies and pick up other people's litter from outside our home yet in the eyes of the law we are criminal. The more happy gatherings the better .
Oh hear we go, another cannabis abuser writing down his flashbacks whilst bleating on about how it should be legalised and how it isn't addictive blah blah blah.

Until the day arrives when it is legalised (which won't be in our lifetime) it's illegal and if you get caught with it you will have a criminal record and rightly so.
[quote][p][bold]over-worked[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources. The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.[/p][/quote]My family and I went and what a fantastic time we had. As for over stretching emergency services bet they are put under more pressure when the big football tournaments are taking place. All we saw were lots of happy people having fun and generally having a good time. So what if some people take drugs .what are you scared of? The sooner prohibition of cannabis is ended the better as many countries have done. No we are not lazy scroungers who started on pot and now are addicts. We work hard in responsible jobs pay our taxes have in the past volunteered for organisations , help old ladies and pick up other people's litter from outside our home yet in the eyes of the law we are criminal. The more happy gatherings the better .[/p][/quote]Oh hear we go, another cannabis abuser writing down his flashbacks whilst bleating on about how it should be legalised and how it isn't addictive blah blah blah. Until the day arrives when it is legalised (which won't be in our lifetime) it's illegal and if you get caught with it you will have a criminal record and rightly so. The Seagull has landed
  • Score: -12

9:13pm Mon 21 Jul 14

The Seagull has landed says...

GracesDad wrote:
Shorty Medlocke wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources.
The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.
Were you forced to go? Have you ever been? Has this festival affected your life in a negative way? No...I didn't think so. You stick to your idea of fun, and let others do what they want to do. One thing you can't call the Beatherder is anti social - it's a great social occasion. Don't be so judgemental.
His idea of fun is slagging people off on here for having different views to his own.

Complete moron that has obviously got several accounts as he keeps getting banned for being a total bellend.
It's called having an opinion you degenerate crotch sniffer, people who live in a democratic society are allowed to have them.
I've noticed that you have yours too but clearly you base them on your fury at being rejected in life such as failing to get through the selection process to become a firefighter. And god only knows the reasons why you decided to belittle those kids at the primary school.
No doubt you've been bullied as a child and continue to be bullied at home. You're wife and kids deserve a medal.
[quote][p][bold]GracesDad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shorty Medlocke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources. The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.[/p][/quote]Were you forced to go? Have you ever been? Has this festival affected your life in a negative way? No...I didn't think so. You stick to your idea of fun, and let others do what they want to do. One thing you can't call the Beatherder is anti social - it's a great social occasion. Don't be so judgemental.[/p][/quote]His idea of fun is slagging people off on here for having different views to his own. Complete moron that has obviously got several accounts as he keeps getting banned for being a total bellend.[/p][/quote]It's called having an opinion you degenerate crotch sniffer, people who live in a democratic society are allowed to have them. I've noticed that you have yours too but clearly you base them on your fury at being rejected in life such as failing to get through the selection process to become a firefighter. And god only knows the reasons why you decided to belittle those kids at the primary school. No doubt you've been bullied as a child and continue to be bullied at home. You're wife and kids deserve a medal. The Seagull has landed
  • Score: -9

10:26pm Mon 21 Jul 14

over-worked says...

The Seagull has landed wrote:
over-worked wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources.
The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.
My family and I went and what a fantastic time we had. As for over stretching emergency services bet they are put under more pressure when the big football tournaments are taking place. All we saw were lots of happy people having fun and generally having a good time. So what if some people take drugs .what are you scared of? The sooner prohibition of cannabis is ended the better as many countries have done. No we are not lazy scroungers who started on pot and now are addicts. We work hard in responsible jobs pay our taxes have in the past volunteered for organisations , help old ladies and pick up other people's litter from outside our home yet in the eyes of the law we are criminal. The more happy gatherings the better .
Oh hear we go, another cannabis abuser writing down his flashbacks whilst bleating on about how it should be legalised and how it isn't addictive blah blah blah.

Until the day arrives when it is legalised (which won't be in our lifetime) it's illegal and if you get caught with it you will have a criminal record and rightly so.
Never had a flash back in my life. Many countries have legalised the wonderful herb recently so it may happen in my life time. How would you sleep at night then when all of the population who like to enjoy cannabis can freely smoke? Read recently that a Tory think tank have been looking at decriminalising it so it may be nearer than you think. Better get your letter off to David Cameron . Peace and love
[quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]over-worked[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources. The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.[/p][/quote]My family and I went and what a fantastic time we had. As for over stretching emergency services bet they are put under more pressure when the big football tournaments are taking place. All we saw were lots of happy people having fun and generally having a good time. So what if some people take drugs .what are you scared of? The sooner prohibition of cannabis is ended the better as many countries have done. No we are not lazy scroungers who started on pot and now are addicts. We work hard in responsible jobs pay our taxes have in the past volunteered for organisations , help old ladies and pick up other people's litter from outside our home yet in the eyes of the law we are criminal. The more happy gatherings the better .[/p][/quote]Oh hear we go, another cannabis abuser writing down his flashbacks whilst bleating on about how it should be legalised and how it isn't addictive blah blah blah. Until the day arrives when it is legalised (which won't be in our lifetime) it's illegal and if you get caught with it you will have a criminal record and rightly so.[/p][/quote]Never had a flash back in my life. Many countries have legalised the wonderful herb recently so it may happen in my life time. How would you sleep at night then when all of the population who like to enjoy cannabis can freely smoke? Read recently that a Tory think tank have been looking at decriminalising it so it may be nearer than you think. Better get your letter off to David Cameron . Peace and love over-worked
  • Score: 8

11:44am Tue 22 Jul 14

GracesDad says...

The Seagull has landed wrote:
GracesDad wrote:
Shorty Medlocke wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources.
The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.
Were you forced to go? Have you ever been? Has this festival affected your life in a negative way? No...I didn't think so. You stick to your idea of fun, and let others do what they want to do. One thing you can't call the Beatherder is anti social - it's a great social occasion. Don't be so judgemental.
His idea of fun is slagging people off on here for having different views to his own.

Complete moron that has obviously got several accounts as he keeps getting banned for being a total bellend.
It's called having an opinion you degenerate crotch sniffer, people who live in a democratic society are allowed to have them.
I've noticed that you have yours too but clearly you base them on your fury at being rejected in life such as failing to get through the selection process to become a firefighter. And god only knows the reasons why you decided to belittle those kids at the primary school.
No doubt you've been bullied as a child and continue to be bullied at home. You're wife and kids deserve a medal.
Hahaha, your attempt at psychology is as ridiculously bad as most of your opinions.

You have my deepest sympathy for being born a complete cretin and I hope you go on to address your issues someday bellend.
[quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GracesDad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shorty Medlocke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources. The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.[/p][/quote]Were you forced to go? Have you ever been? Has this festival affected your life in a negative way? No...I didn't think so. You stick to your idea of fun, and let others do what they want to do. One thing you can't call the Beatherder is anti social - it's a great social occasion. Don't be so judgemental.[/p][/quote]His idea of fun is slagging people off on here for having different views to his own. Complete moron that has obviously got several accounts as he keeps getting banned for being a total bellend.[/p][/quote]It's called having an opinion you degenerate crotch sniffer, people who live in a democratic society are allowed to have them. I've noticed that you have yours too but clearly you base them on your fury at being rejected in life such as failing to get through the selection process to become a firefighter. And god only knows the reasons why you decided to belittle those kids at the primary school. No doubt you've been bullied as a child and continue to be bullied at home. You're wife and kids deserve a medal.[/p][/quote]Hahaha, your attempt at psychology is as ridiculously bad as most of your opinions. You have my deepest sympathy for being born a complete cretin and I hope you go on to address your issues someday bellend. GracesDad
  • Score: 5

12:11pm Tue 22 Jul 14

The Seagull has landed says...

GracesDad wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
GracesDad wrote:
Shorty Medlocke wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources.
The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.
Were you forced to go? Have you ever been? Has this festival affected your life in a negative way? No...I didn't think so. You stick to your idea of fun, and let others do what they want to do. One thing you can't call the Beatherder is anti social - it's a great social occasion. Don't be so judgemental.
His idea of fun is slagging people off on here for having different views to his own.

Complete moron that has obviously got several accounts as he keeps getting banned for being a total bellend.
It's called having an opinion you degenerate crotch sniffer, people who live in a democratic society are allowed to have them.
I've noticed that you have yours too but clearly you base them on your fury at being rejected in life such as failing to get through the selection process to become a firefighter. And god only knows the reasons why you decided to belittle those kids at the primary school.
No doubt you've been bullied as a child and continue to be bullied at home. You're wife and kids deserve a medal.
Hahaha, your attempt at psychology is as ridiculously bad as most of your opinions.

You have my deepest sympathy for being born a complete cretin and I hope you go on to address your issues someday bellend.
Poor Grace, having you as a father.
[quote][p][bold]GracesDad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GracesDad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shorty Medlocke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Yeah a real success, a raft of people pilled up to the eyeballs making a mess in the countryside, anti social behaviour levels going up draining the already over stretched emergency services resources. The sooner Ribble Valley council ban this pointless drug festival the better.[/p][/quote]Were you forced to go? Have you ever been? Has this festival affected your life in a negative way? No...I didn't think so. You stick to your idea of fun, and let others do what they want to do. One thing you can't call the Beatherder is anti social - it's a great social occasion. Don't be so judgemental.[/p][/quote]His idea of fun is slagging people off on here for having different views to his own. Complete moron that has obviously got several accounts as he keeps getting banned for being a total bellend.[/p][/quote]It's called having an opinion you degenerate crotch sniffer, people who live in a democratic society are allowed to have them. I've noticed that you have yours too but clearly you base them on your fury at being rejected in life such as failing to get through the selection process to become a firefighter. And god only knows the reasons why you decided to belittle those kids at the primary school. No doubt you've been bullied as a child and continue to be bullied at home. You're wife and kids deserve a medal.[/p][/quote]Hahaha, your attempt at psychology is as ridiculously bad as most of your opinions. You have my deepest sympathy for being born a complete cretin and I hope you go on to address your issues someday bellend.[/p][/quote]Poor Grace, having you as a father. The Seagull has landed
  • Score: -4

4:57pm Tue 22 Jul 14

Randyjulian says...

So, mr seagull, do you therefore think that basically all music events, gigs, festivals, whatever, should also be banned, as I challenge you to name one where there are not at least a minority of people using illegal substances? And moreover, wrt the mention of football matches, to which I would also like to add pubs, clubs, working men's clubs etc etc, what about alcohol? THE worst drug around, but only legal because of history and politics. It makes people disorientated, unbalanced, aggressive, unable to make rational and safe decisions and judgement, and also causes a hell of a lot of health problems and stresses emergency services far more than any other illegal substance.

So - do you agree, therefore, that if your argument that beatherder should be stopped, then so too should all other musical festivals, gigs, concerts, for fear of them attracting "pill heads" (all be it, as someone has already mentioned, to the middle of nowhere, with no one to bother, plus to an event where people would also get paralytic on booze, and so still require emergency services), along with alcohol being banned? Hmmm, I'll be interested in your answer.

On a final note, I went to beatherder for the first time this year. It was the best experience I've had in years. Not only for the music, but for the people I met. Plenty of random people, some of them certainly on drugs, some probably not. But the point is, everyone was there for the same reason, to have fun. It was a group of people out for the same goal, a collective who would look after each other as much as possible, despite never having met before, and probably never to meet again. Why is that such a bad thing? Not once did I see a fight, but many times I saw complete strangers dancing together, laughing, sharing a moment that many people are not fortunate enough to experience. A stark contrast to what I see in the pubs in the city over a weekend.
So, mr seagull, do you therefore think that basically all music events, gigs, festivals, whatever, should also be banned, as I challenge you to name one where there are not at least a minority of people using illegal substances? And moreover, wrt the mention of football matches, to which I would also like to add pubs, clubs, working men's clubs etc etc, what about alcohol? THE worst drug around, but only legal because of history and politics. It makes people disorientated, unbalanced, aggressive, unable to make rational and safe decisions and judgement, and also causes a hell of a lot of health problems and stresses emergency services far more than any other illegal substance. So - do you agree, therefore, that if your argument that beatherder should be stopped, then so too should all other musical festivals, gigs, concerts, for fear of them attracting "pill heads" (all be it, as someone has already mentioned, to the middle of nowhere, with no one to bother, plus to an event where people would also get paralytic on booze, and so still require emergency services), along with alcohol being banned? Hmmm, I'll be interested in your answer. On a final note, I went to beatherder for the first time this year. It was the best experience I've had in years. Not only for the music, but for the people I met. Plenty of random people, some of them certainly on drugs, some probably not. But the point is, everyone was there for the same reason, to have fun. It was a group of people out for the same goal, a collective who would look after each other as much as possible, despite never having met before, and probably never to meet again. Why is that such a bad thing? Not once did I see a fight, but many times I saw complete strangers dancing together, laughing, sharing a moment that many people are not fortunate enough to experience. A stark contrast to what I see in the pubs in the city over a weekend. Randyjulian
  • Score: 4

10:30pm Tue 22 Jul 14

The Seagull has landed says...

Randyjulian wrote:
So, mr seagull, do you therefore think that basically all music events, gigs, festivals, whatever, should also be banned, as I challenge you to name one where there are not at least a minority of people using illegal substances? And moreover, wrt the mention of football matches, to which I would also like to add pubs, clubs, working men's clubs etc etc, what about alcohol? THE worst drug around, but only legal because of history and politics. It makes people disorientated, unbalanced, aggressive, unable to make rational and safe decisions and judgement, and also causes a hell of a lot of health problems and stresses emergency services far more than any other illegal substance.

So - do you agree, therefore, that if your argument that beatherder should be stopped, then so too should all other musical festivals, gigs, concerts, for fear of them attracting "pill heads" (all be it, as someone has already mentioned, to the middle of nowhere, with no one to bother, plus to an event where people would also get paralytic on booze, and so still require emergency services), along with alcohol being banned? Hmmm, I'll be interested in your answer.

On a final note, I went to beatherder for the first time this year. It was the best experience I've had in years. Not only for the music, but for the people I met. Plenty of random people, some of them certainly on drugs, some probably not. But the point is, everyone was there for the same reason, to have fun. It was a group of people out for the same goal, a collective who would look after each other as much as possible, despite never having met before, and probably never to meet again. Why is that such a bad thing? Not once did I see a fight, but many times I saw complete strangers dancing together, laughing, sharing a moment that many people are not fortunate enough to experience. A stark contrast to what I see in the pubs in the city over a weekend.
I totally agree with you. Alcohol should be banned, it's the root cause of a large volume of violence and crime in general and the strain on the NHS, police and whole host of other agencies is phenomenal and costs billions every year.
But will it ever be banned? No
Should we add to these problems by legalising drugs? No
Who knows what the answer should be? Is there one?
[quote][p][bold]Randyjulian[/bold] wrote: So, mr seagull, do you therefore think that basically all music events, gigs, festivals, whatever, should also be banned, as I challenge you to name one where there are not at least a minority of people using illegal substances? And moreover, wrt the mention of football matches, to which I would also like to add pubs, clubs, working men's clubs etc etc, what about alcohol? THE worst drug around, but only legal because of history and politics. It makes people disorientated, unbalanced, aggressive, unable to make rational and safe decisions and judgement, and also causes a hell of a lot of health problems and stresses emergency services far more than any other illegal substance. So - do you agree, therefore, that if your argument that beatherder should be stopped, then so too should all other musical festivals, gigs, concerts, for fear of them attracting "pill heads" (all be it, as someone has already mentioned, to the middle of nowhere, with no one to bother, plus to an event where people would also get paralytic on booze, and so still require emergency services), along with alcohol being banned? Hmmm, I'll be interested in your answer. On a final note, I went to beatherder for the first time this year. It was the best experience I've had in years. Not only for the music, but for the people I met. Plenty of random people, some of them certainly on drugs, some probably not. But the point is, everyone was there for the same reason, to have fun. It was a group of people out for the same goal, a collective who would look after each other as much as possible, despite never having met before, and probably never to meet again. Why is that such a bad thing? Not once did I see a fight, but many times I saw complete strangers dancing together, laughing, sharing a moment that many people are not fortunate enough to experience. A stark contrast to what I see in the pubs in the city over a weekend.[/p][/quote]I totally agree with you. Alcohol should be banned, it's the root cause of a large volume of violence and crime in general and the strain on the NHS, police and whole host of other agencies is phenomenal and costs billions every year. But will it ever be banned? No Should we add to these problems by legalising drugs? No Who knows what the answer should be? Is there one? The Seagull has landed
  • Score: 0

11:59pm Tue 22 Jul 14

Randyjulian says...

The Seagull has landed wrote:
Randyjulian wrote:
So, mr seagull, do you therefore think that basically all music events, gigs, festivals, whatever, should also be banned, as I challenge you to name one where there are not at least a minority of people using illegal substances? And moreover, wrt the mention of football matches, to which I would also like to add pubs, clubs, working men's clubs etc etc, what about alcohol? THE worst drug around, but only legal because of history and politics. It makes people disorientated, unbalanced, aggressive, unable to make rational and safe decisions and judgement, and also causes a hell of a lot of health problems and stresses emergency services far more than any other illegal substance.

So - do you agree, therefore, that if your argument that beatherder should be stopped, then so too should all other musical festivals, gigs, concerts, for fear of them attracting "pill heads" (all be it, as someone has already mentioned, to the middle of nowhere, with no one to bother, plus to an event where people would also get paralytic on booze, and so still require emergency services), along with alcohol being banned? Hmmm, I'll be interested in your answer.

On a final note, I went to beatherder for the first time this year. It was the best experience I've had in years. Not only for the music, but for the people I met. Plenty of random people, some of them certainly on drugs, some probably not. But the point is, everyone was there for the same reason, to have fun. It was a group of people out for the same goal, a collective who would look after each other as much as possible, despite never having met before, and probably never to meet again. Why is that such a bad thing? Not once did I see a fight, but many times I saw complete strangers dancing together, laughing, sharing a moment that many people are not fortunate enough to experience. A stark contrast to what I see in the pubs in the city over a weekend.
I totally agree with you. Alcohol should be banned, it's the root cause of a large volume of violence and crime in general and the strain on the NHS, police and whole host of other agencies is phenomenal and costs billions every year.
But will it ever be banned? No
Should we add to these problems by legalising drugs? No
Who knows what the answer should be? Is there one?
Ok, glad to hear you are in agreement with that. Now if I may elaborate on my point. Alcohol, in excess, often causes people to act in aggressive, primal, malcoordinated, ways with a lack of rational judgement. It also is severely detrimental to health.

Ban it, good.

For all the reasons but one - the health issue. This is a tricky point, but many things in life are a danger to health, but which many people enjoy as "recreational activities" or hobbies, I guess. Take rock climbing, motogp, skiing, surfing, kayaking, mountain bike riding, boxing, gymnastics, fell running, I could go on but I'm sure you get my point. Now if we ban alcohol on the grounds that it is bad for health, then surely we must consider some of the other things that people enjoy in their spare time, and are also a danger to health. Yes - alcohol is only a problem to health in excess, but virtually everyone is aware of this. Far fewer people are probably aware of the risks of taking such other pastimes as I have mentioned to extremes, and will be far less educated in their individual limits, which for alcohol are quite clearly define for one and all.

So back to my main point - we cannot ban alcohol primarily for health reasons, because then surely my point above would have to stand. Also, these other "pastimes" are actually good for your health if entered into carefully and well informed. Opposition to a ban on alcohol would be based around human rights, the right of people to choose how to look after their health, the importance of educating the masses (as is already done) to make sure the decision to drink to excess is an informed one. I think this is fair, people should be educated, they should have a choice, and if they choose wisely, they can keep enjoying their few beers through the week quite happily, and no harm will come. If they choose to abuse the drug, they should face the consequences, as they certainly do in many ways now - drink driving, drunk and disorderly etc etc. I think these consequences should also extend to healthcare. As they should for smokers (and yes, I smoke and occasionally drink to excess, and I would be perfectly happy to accept any penalty placed on me surrounding my healthcare should I come a cropper because of these informed decisions I am making with my own life. Insurance companies seem to be able to sting you on premiums if you drive carelessly and crash, is this not the same thing?) and so on...

So this rules out the option of banning alcohol on health grounds, so what else did we have? "Alcohol, in excess , often causes people to act in aggressive, primal, malcoordinated, ways with a lack of rational judgement."

I'm sure almost everyone would agree with this, having seen the numerous drunks abroad, drunks in cities, drunks falling over, drunk driving, drunks driving (and so on) programmes on tv. I'm sure many, many people have also probably experienced this situation at least once in their lives. Yes, occasionally people have adverse, unusual reactions to illicit substances (alcohol being one of these too), but alcohol is a drug that does just what I have said above. It gets you drunk, if enough is taken. Now what is cannabis famous for? Student nights in, chatting nonesense and playing games, hippies at music festivals too stoned to stand up and dance, socialising and interacting civilly and in a calm, relaxed manner. A stark contrast to the effects of alcohol, becoming even more stark when each is taken in excess. How about "pill heads"? Energetic, wide eyed all night party animals, listening to electronic music that makes people share a moment dancing, enjoying a community brought together by a similar interest, often caught hugging each other randomly through an emotional enlightenment and connection that is difficult to find with complete strangers through any other means. Especially alcohol.

So if we look at these "adverse effects" of illicit substances, surely the potential strain that other drugs would place on emergency services for the effects on community, safety etc etc are far more prevalent with alcohol misuse, than any other substance? Yes, heroin is incredibly addictive, and leads down a dark path. This again boils down to education. People know how very bad for you it is, and how very addictive it is, so on the most part they choose not to use it. Those that do take the risk do so at the expense of their own health. People are well aware of this, which is why, compared to other drugs, it has very few users.

It also causes people to barely move for several hours, and so poses no risk to anyone else's health or well being.

To this you may comment, but what about the people who turn to crime to pay for drug habits. Fair point, but this is an issue of the hold the underground market has over these people. There is no regulation of these substances, so dealers can charge what they like, to who they like. They have no conscience, no advertising regarding health risks, no support network etc. now what about the
[quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Randyjulian[/bold] wrote: So, mr seagull, do you therefore think that basically all music events, gigs, festivals, whatever, should also be banned, as I challenge you to name one where there are not at least a minority of people using illegal substances? And moreover, wrt the mention of football matches, to which I would also like to add pubs, clubs, working men's clubs etc etc, what about alcohol? THE worst drug around, but only legal because of history and politics. It makes people disorientated, unbalanced, aggressive, unable to make rational and safe decisions and judgement, and also causes a hell of a lot of health problems and stresses emergency services far more than any other illegal substance. So - do you agree, therefore, that if your argument that beatherder should be stopped, then so too should all other musical festivals, gigs, concerts, for fear of them attracting "pill heads" (all be it, as someone has already mentioned, to the middle of nowhere, with no one to bother, plus to an event where people would also get paralytic on booze, and so still require emergency services), along with alcohol being banned? Hmmm, I'll be interested in your answer. On a final note, I went to beatherder for the first time this year. It was the best experience I've had in years. Not only for the music, but for the people I met. Plenty of random people, some of them certainly on drugs, some probably not. But the point is, everyone was there for the same reason, to have fun. It was a group of people out for the same goal, a collective who would look after each other as much as possible, despite never having met before, and probably never to meet again. Why is that such a bad thing? Not once did I see a fight, but many times I saw complete strangers dancing together, laughing, sharing a moment that many people are not fortunate enough to experience. A stark contrast to what I see in the pubs in the city over a weekend.[/p][/quote]I totally agree with you. Alcohol should be banned, it's the root cause of a large volume of violence and crime in general and the strain on the NHS, police and whole host of other agencies is phenomenal and costs billions every year. But will it ever be banned? No Should we add to these problems by legalising drugs? No Who knows what the answer should be? Is there one?[/p][/quote]Ok, glad to hear you are in agreement with that. Now if I may elaborate on my point. Alcohol, in excess, often causes people to act in aggressive, primal, malcoordinated, ways with a lack of rational judgement. It also is severely detrimental to health. Ban it, good. For all the reasons but one - the health issue. This is a tricky point, but many things in life are a danger to health, but which many people enjoy as "recreational activities" or hobbies, I guess. Take rock climbing, motogp, skiing, surfing, kayaking, mountain bike riding, boxing, gymnastics, fell running, I could go on but I'm sure you get my point. Now if we ban alcohol on the grounds that it is bad for health, then surely we must consider some of the other things that people enjoy in their spare time, and are also a danger to health. Yes - alcohol is only a problem to health in excess, but virtually everyone is aware of this. Far fewer people are probably aware of the risks of taking such other pastimes as I have mentioned to extremes, and will be far less educated in their individual limits, which for alcohol are quite clearly define for one and all. So back to my main point - we cannot ban alcohol primarily for health reasons, because then surely my point above would have to stand. Also, these other "pastimes" are actually good for your health if entered into carefully and well informed. Opposition to a ban on alcohol would be based around human rights, the right of people to choose how to look after their health, the importance of educating the masses (as is already done) to make sure the decision to drink to excess is an informed one. I think this is fair, people should be educated, they should have a choice, and if they choose wisely, they can keep enjoying their few beers through the week quite happily, and no harm will come. If they choose to abuse the drug, they should face the consequences, as they certainly do in many ways now - drink driving, drunk and disorderly etc etc. I think these consequences should also extend to healthcare. As they should for smokers (and yes, I smoke and occasionally drink to excess, and I would be perfectly happy to accept any penalty placed on me surrounding my healthcare should I come a cropper because of these informed decisions I am making with my own life. Insurance companies seem to be able to sting you on premiums if you drive carelessly and crash, is this not the same thing?) and so on... So this rules out the option of banning alcohol on health grounds, so what else did we have? "Alcohol, in excess , often causes people to act in aggressive, primal, malcoordinated, ways with a lack of rational judgement." I'm sure almost everyone would agree with this, having seen the numerous drunks abroad, drunks in cities, drunks falling over, drunk driving, drunks driving (and so on) programmes on tv. I'm sure many, many people have also probably experienced this situation at least once in their lives. Yes, occasionally people have adverse, unusual reactions to illicit substances (alcohol being one of these too), but alcohol is a drug that does just what I have said above. It gets you drunk, if enough is taken. Now what is cannabis famous for? Student nights in, chatting nonesense and playing games, hippies at music festivals too stoned to stand up and dance, socialising and interacting civilly and in a calm, relaxed manner. A stark contrast to the effects of alcohol, becoming even more stark when each is taken in excess. How about "pill heads"? Energetic, wide eyed all night party animals, listening to electronic music that makes people share a moment dancing, enjoying a community brought together by a similar interest, often caught hugging each other randomly through an emotional enlightenment and connection that is difficult to find with complete strangers through any other means. Especially alcohol. So if we look at these "adverse effects" of illicit substances, surely the potential strain that other drugs would place on emergency services for the effects on community, safety etc etc are far more prevalent with alcohol misuse, than any other substance? Yes, heroin is incredibly addictive, and leads down a dark path. This again boils down to education. People know how very bad for you it is, and how very addictive it is, so on the most part they choose not to use it. Those that do take the risk do so at the expense of their own health. People are well aware of this, which is why, compared to other drugs, it has very few users. It also causes people to barely move for several hours, and so poses no risk to anyone else's health or well being. To this you may comment, but what about the people who turn to crime to pay for drug habits. Fair point, but this is an issue of the hold the underground market has over these people. There is no regulation of these substances, so dealers can charge what they like, to who they like. They have no conscience, no advertising regarding health risks, no support network etc. now what about the Randyjulian
  • Score: 0

12:09am Wed 23 Jul 14

Randyjulian says...

Didn't finish, sorry!

...now what about the... This was a typo, I don't quite know where I was going with it! Probably because I've had a joint, and so lost my train of thought slightly. No harm done mind, at least I didn't go punch a guy because I didn't like the way he was looking at me after I spilt my eighth pint on his girlfriend.

I'll keep this last bit snappy, I've waffled on long enough. My point, I guess, is that almost all other drugs pose little if any harm to the rest of society, as mentioned and clarified towards the end of my previous post, just the user. This is a health matter, for which controlling such substances seems like a breach of human rights and choice. And other problems brought about by drugs crime are due to the illicit nature of the substances, and the underground markets controlling their sale and distribution. Place this in an officials hands, legalise and control them safely, regulate their supply and distribution, and educate the masses in the effects that these substances will have on their own health (just like we do with alcohol), give the masses an informed choice (as we do with alcohol), and penalise them for abuse of this choice (as we mostly do with alcohol), and you would have a fair, and much safer, system surrounding currently "illicit substances".
Didn't finish, sorry! ...now what about the... This was a typo, I don't quite know where I was going with it! Probably because I've had a joint, and so lost my train of thought slightly. No harm done mind, at least I didn't go punch a guy because I didn't like the way he was looking at me after I spilt my eighth pint on his girlfriend. I'll keep this last bit snappy, I've waffled on long enough. My point, I guess, is that almost all other drugs pose little if any harm to the rest of society, as mentioned and clarified towards the end of my previous post, just the user. This is a health matter, for which controlling such substances seems like a breach of human rights and choice. And other problems brought about by drugs crime are due to the illicit nature of the substances, and the underground markets controlling their sale and distribution. Place this in an officials hands, legalise and control them safely, regulate their supply and distribution, and educate the masses in the effects that these substances will have on their own health (just like we do with alcohol), give the masses an informed choice (as we do with alcohol), and penalise them for abuse of this choice (as we mostly do with alcohol), and you would have a fair, and much safer, system surrounding currently "illicit substances". Randyjulian
  • Score: 2

1:30am Wed 23 Jul 14

Randyjulian says...

My mistake, ...now what about the... was not a typo. Must be the effects a joint has on short term memory. Not so much so long term however, fortunately. Which allows me to hold down a steady, responsible job, with no adverse effects on my performance at work. At least I'm not drunk, I certainly wouldn't be able function at work tomorrow if I was.

...now what about the health points when it comes to maintaining the illegality of currently illegal substances? Smoking cannabis poses a significant risk to the respiratory and cardiac systems and a minor, still somewhat theoretical, risk to the central nervous system in the form of suggested exacerbation of pre existing psychological problems. Fine, like should be done with cigarette smokers, penalise people if they choose to take these informed risks with their health. Ecstasy? Risk of cardiac failure and dehydration, depression and mood change in a minority of people who abuse the substance to excess. Fine, penalise people again if they choose to take these informed risks with their health. I could go on, but I'm sure you catch my drift.

Alcohol, particularly in excess, is far more detrimental to health than many other, currently illegal, "illicit substances". In moderation I'm sure these substances could be, and have been, shown to be of very little detriment to health, save a few exceptions (as with alcohol).

So the potential strain placed on community and others, police forces etc is clearly more of a problem with alcohol users (and particularly abusers), because the adverse effects on behaviour brought about by this drug are far more of a risk to others than with virtually any other drug. I personally cannot think of one drug that makes people behave in a more antisocial manner than alcohol, when talking about the wider community, not just a few beers with a close group of mates at home of course. Unless, perhaps, you misinterpreted one of these mates, had an underlying niggle with them, and decided in your fired up, primal state that you were going to resolve all this there and then, in the only way your primal self knows how. I mean god forbid someone was in that position stoned, or "pilled up", they may run the risk of talking with their mate about the problem, and resolving it amicably and peacefully, or even rationalising their perceived problems with their mate and just giving them a long, loving cuddle. That would tear the emergency services apart.

But, I sense you may ask, what about all the irresponsible druggies who choose to adversely affect the community in other ways, indirectly and sometimes maybe unintentionally? Drug drivers, drug crime to pay for habits etc etc. Fair point. Penalise them, as we currently do with alcohol, and offer support and education for the ones that go off the rails, as we currently do with alcohol.

Now this really does bring me to a close. If only I hadn't accidentally pressed the "post comment" button too early, this would have flowed much better! My final issue of yours to deal with - the cost to the country, public services, health service, taxpayer and so on, if these substances were legalised. Well, I'm sure you have noticed a theme in my thread, based mainly around penalising individuals who choose to take informed risks with their health. Yes, accidents happen, and thank whichever god you believe in for the NHS and the level of service this offers us. Many will disagree with this statement regarding level of service, but try having an accident abroad in a country without an NHS. Even a simple accident or innocent illness will make your eyes and bank balance smart in many, many other countries. Here, it's covered. Anything that carries an excessive risk to health, because of a lack of appropriate self control, ignorance or otherwise, should carry an extra financial penalty to subsidise the services involved in getting you out of the mess that only you have gotten yourself into. This would help motivate people to make better informed, educated decisions about how they choose to spend their recreational time, especially if drugs were involved. Nothing motivates more than hitting someone where it hurts - in the pocket. It would also virtually eliminate underground drugs rings, hence easing the huge pressure and financial burden placed on police forces to deal with these at present.

There's all that, but don't forget all the extra tax and revenue the government would accrue from the sale of these substances. They ain't expensive to make (plants grow with a bit of food, water and sunlight; chemists can brew up chemicals for very little expense in a properly equipped lab), just like alcohol and cigarettes, and look at the tax mark up on these two currently legal substances, that are loved by the government for revenue. Yes they're a strain on the health service and police, alongside others, which is reflected in their high taxation, yet would be less of a strain if further financially penalties were in place for their misuse.

Just think of the tax revenue a government could accrue if other, currently illegal substances were legalised, regulated appropriately, taxed substantially and penalised suitably for misuse in individuals doing so in a massively well informed society.
My mistake, ...now what about the... was not a typo. Must be the effects a joint has on short term memory. Not so much so long term however, fortunately. Which allows me to hold down a steady, responsible job, with no adverse effects on my performance at work. At least I'm not drunk, I certainly wouldn't be able function at work tomorrow if I was. ...now what about the health points when it comes to maintaining the illegality of currently illegal substances? Smoking cannabis poses a significant risk to the respiratory and cardiac systems and a minor, still somewhat theoretical, risk to the central nervous system in the form of suggested exacerbation of pre existing psychological problems. Fine, like should be done with cigarette smokers, penalise people if they choose to take these informed risks with their health. Ecstasy? Risk of cardiac failure and dehydration, depression and mood change in a minority of people who abuse the substance to excess. Fine, penalise people again if they choose to take these informed risks with their health. I could go on, but I'm sure you catch my drift. Alcohol, particularly in excess, is far more detrimental to health than many other, currently illegal, "illicit substances". In moderation I'm sure these substances could be, and have been, shown to be of very little detriment to health, save a few exceptions (as with alcohol). So the potential strain placed on community and others, police forces etc is clearly more of a problem with alcohol users (and particularly abusers), because the adverse effects on behaviour brought about by this drug are far more of a risk to others than with virtually any other drug. I personally cannot think of one drug that makes people behave in a more antisocial manner than alcohol, when talking about the wider community, not just a few beers with a close group of mates at home of course. Unless, perhaps, you misinterpreted one of these mates, had an underlying niggle with them, and decided in your fired up, primal state that you were going to resolve all this there and then, in the only way your primal self knows how. I mean god forbid someone was in that position stoned, or "pilled up", they may run the risk of talking with their mate about the problem, and resolving it amicably and peacefully, or even rationalising their perceived problems with their mate and just giving them a long, loving cuddle. That would tear the emergency services apart. But, I sense you may ask, what about all the irresponsible druggies who choose to adversely affect the community in other ways, indirectly and sometimes maybe unintentionally? Drug drivers, drug crime to pay for habits etc etc. Fair point. Penalise them, as we currently do with alcohol, and offer support and education for the ones that go off the rails, as we currently do with alcohol. Now this really does bring me to a close. If only I hadn't accidentally pressed the "post comment" button too early, this would have flowed much better! My final issue of yours to deal with - the cost to the country, public services, health service, taxpayer and so on, if these substances were legalised. Well, I'm sure you have noticed a theme in my thread, based mainly around penalising individuals who choose to take informed risks with their health. Yes, accidents happen, and thank whichever god you believe in for the NHS and the level of service this offers us. Many will disagree with this statement regarding level of service, but try having an accident abroad in a country without an NHS. Even a simple accident or innocent illness will make your eyes and bank balance smart in many, many other countries. Here, it's covered. Anything that carries an excessive risk to health, because of a lack of appropriate self control, ignorance or otherwise, should carry an extra financial penalty to subsidise the services involved in getting you out of the mess that only you have gotten yourself into. This would help motivate people to make better informed, educated decisions about how they choose to spend their recreational time, especially if drugs were involved. Nothing motivates more than hitting someone where it hurts - in the pocket. It would also virtually eliminate underground drugs rings, hence easing the huge pressure and financial burden placed on police forces to deal with these at present. There's all that, but don't forget all the extra tax and revenue the government would accrue from the sale of these substances. They ain't expensive to make (plants grow with a bit of food, water and sunlight; chemists can brew up chemicals for very little expense in a properly equipped lab), just like alcohol and cigarettes, and look at the tax mark up on these two currently legal substances, that are loved by the government for revenue. Yes they're a strain on the health service and police, alongside others, which is reflected in their high taxation, yet would be less of a strain if further financially penalties were in place for their misuse. Just think of the tax revenue a government could accrue if other, currently illegal substances were legalised, regulated appropriately, taxed substantially and penalised suitably for misuse in individuals doing so in a massively well informed society. Randyjulian
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree