PlayStation serial number trapped East Lancs burglar

Matthew Weller

Matthew Weller

First published in East Lancashire by , Court reporter

A THIRD-TIME house raider who struck in the early hours was caught after someone tried to sell a stolen PlayStation at Cash Converters — but the victim had recorded the serial number.

Burnley Crown Court was told how Matthew Weller, 32, was arrested and finger and footwear prints left at the victim’s family home were matched to him.

He had got in through an insecure window and let himself out through the back door.

Weller, of Edmund Street, Accrington, who has a record going back to the juvenile court, is now behind bars for 876 days.

He admitted burglary at the property on Belfield Road, Accrington, in which he stole the PlayStation, a laptop computer, handbag and contents and electrical items, in April.

Charles Brown, prosecuting, said the offence took place at the home of a couple and their two children, between 5am and 6.30am, when they were all asleep in their beds.

A window at the house didn’t close properly and when the children’s mother got up at 6.30am, and went downstairs, she found their home had been targeted.

Mr Brown said a check revealed property had been stolen and police were called. On April 25, the manager of Cash Converters called the police to report someone had been trying to sell a PlayStation.

The victim had recorded the serial number and had given it to the police.

The prosecutor continued: “It is an object lesson in how useful it is to record these things.”

The handbag and contents were found at Weller’s home.

Mr Brown said the defendant was arrested that evening.

Fingerprint evidence was recovered from the point of entry at the house and was identified as being Weller’s.

Shoe marking was found inside the house and matched the pattern on the footwear the defendant had on when detained.

Weller was questioned and made no comment.

The prosecutor said in 2001, the defendant was convicted of house burglary and was jailed for 30 months.

He committed his second house burglary in July 2011. His licence on that sentence had been revoked and he had been recalled.

Philip Holden, defending, said Weller had a poor record, particularly for matters of dishonesty.

Sentencing, Judge Jonathan Gibson told the defendant: “This was at a family home, when members of the family were upstairs in bed.”

Comments (7)

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4:08pm Wed 14 May 14

Bluelizzy says...

I think "Third time house raider" probably should read "Third time caught house raider".Cann't believe he got caught every time he burgled.
I think "Third time house raider" probably should read "Third time caught house raider".Cann't believe he got caught every time he burgled. Bluelizzy
  • Score: 13

5:31pm Wed 14 May 14

Steven Seagull says...

Bluelizzy wrote:
I think "Third time house raider" probably should read "Third time caught house raider".Cann't believe he got caught every time he burgled.
F**king filthy scum of the earth. Nothing but a drain on society and always will be.

Two words......Lethal injection.
[quote][p][bold]Bluelizzy[/bold] wrote: I think "Third time house raider" probably should read "Third time caught house raider".Cann't believe he got caught every time he burgled.[/p][/quote]F**king filthy scum of the earth. Nothing but a drain on society and always will be. Two words......Lethal injection. Steven Seagull
  • Score: 9

8:11pm Wed 14 May 14

woolywords says...

Maximum sentence for burglary is 14 years.
This is his 3rd offence of this type, when does he become eligible for a more appropriate sentence than this derisory one?
7 or more years would be nearer the mark, to express both punishment and a message to others.
Maximum sentence for burglary is 14 years. This is his 3rd offence of this type, when does he become eligible for a more appropriate sentence than this derisory one? 7 or more years would be nearer the mark, to express both punishment and a message to others. woolywords
  • Score: 7

8:34pm Wed 14 May 14

woolywords says...

Perhaps I should set out how my ideal system works...

First conviction for burglary, 3 years but released after 12 months - with the balance served as a 2 year suspended sentence.
However, should you commit a burglary within that period, your sentence is now 7 years, where you will serve the 2 years outstanding then 2/3rd's of the 7 year sentence (or 6 years 8 months).
If you are ever convicted of a third burglary after this, you will serve the whole term of a 14 year sentence, with no prospect of parole or early release. There will be no allowances made for mitigation, early guilty pleas nor any lame excuse that you care to create, as the sentences will be well publicised.
This, 3 Strike Rule, is intended to strike fear of imprisonment in the minds of those who choose to commit these crimes and show to the public that they will be protected.
Perhaps I should set out how my ideal system works... First conviction for burglary, 3 years but released after 12 months - with the balance served as a 2 year suspended sentence. However, should you commit a burglary within that period, your sentence is now 7 years, where you will serve the 2 years outstanding then 2/3rd's of the 7 year sentence (or 6 years 8 months). If you are ever convicted of a third burglary after this, you will serve the whole term of a 14 year sentence, with no prospect of parole or early release. There will be no allowances made for mitigation, early guilty pleas nor any lame excuse that you care to create, as the sentences will be well publicised. This, 3 Strike Rule, is intended to strike fear of imprisonment in the minds of those who choose to commit these crimes and show to the public that they will be protected. woolywords
  • Score: 5

6:57am Thu 15 May 14

onlyonesimongarner says...

woolywords wrote:
Perhaps I should set out how my ideal system works...

First conviction for burglary, 3 years but released after 12 months - with the balance served as a 2 year suspended sentence.
However, should you commit a burglary within that period, your sentence is now 7 years, where you will serve the 2 years outstanding then 2/3rd's of the 7 year sentence (or 6 years 8 months).
If you are ever convicted of a third burglary after this, you will serve the whole term of a 14 year sentence, with no prospect of parole or early release. There will be no allowances made for mitigation, early guilty pleas nor any lame excuse that you care to create, as the sentences will be well publicised.
This, 3 Strike Rule, is intended to strike fear of imprisonment in the minds of those who choose to commit these crimes and show to the public that they will be protected.
Too Sensible by Far Woolywords , and what about theHuman Rights????, after all they might be from a Broken home . I wonder if any of our wannabe politicians would dare support this kind of approach???
[quote][p][bold]woolywords[/bold] wrote: Perhaps I should set out how my ideal system works... First conviction for burglary, 3 years but released after 12 months - with the balance served as a 2 year suspended sentence. However, should you commit a burglary within that period, your sentence is now 7 years, where you will serve the 2 years outstanding then 2/3rd's of the 7 year sentence (or 6 years 8 months). If you are ever convicted of a third burglary after this, you will serve the whole term of a 14 year sentence, with no prospect of parole or early release. There will be no allowances made for mitigation, early guilty pleas nor any lame excuse that you care to create, as the sentences will be well publicised. This, 3 Strike Rule, is intended to strike fear of imprisonment in the minds of those who choose to commit these crimes and show to the public that they will be protected.[/p][/quote]Too Sensible by Far Woolywords , and what about theHuman Rights????, after all they might be from a Broken home . I wonder if any of our wannabe politicians would dare support this kind of approach??? onlyonesimongarner
  • Score: 1

8:14am Thu 15 May 14

Hughster2014 says...

Sick of english doin stuff like this terrible
Sick of english doin stuff like this terrible Hughster2014
  • Score: 0

12:08pm Thu 15 May 14

woolywords says...

onlyonesimongarner wrote:
woolywords wrote:
Perhaps I should set out how my ideal system works...

First conviction for burglary, 3 years but released after 12 months - with the balance served as a 2 year suspended sentence.
However, should you commit a burglary within that period, your sentence is now 7 years, where you will serve the 2 years outstanding then 2/3rd's of the 7 year sentence (or 6 years 8 months).
If you are ever convicted of a third burglary after this, you will serve the whole term of a 14 year sentence, with no prospect of parole or early release. There will be no allowances made for mitigation, early guilty pleas nor any lame excuse that you care to create, as the sentences will be well publicised.
This, 3 Strike Rule, is intended to strike fear of imprisonment in the minds of those who choose to commit these crimes and show to the public that they will be protected.
Too Sensible by Far Woolywords , and what about theHuman Rights????, after all they might be from a Broken home . I wonder if any of our wannabe politicians would dare support this kind of approach???
They, the offender, have lost their chance to claim an infringement of their Human Rights, when they commit an offence and are then imprisoned.

Article 8 of the Human Rights Act states that, 'The right to respect for your home....without interference or intrusion by others...' and I would argue that the State fails to protect the citizen against the offender, by not applying a prison term, of such severity, that it acts as a deterrent to crime.
If the State is able to maintain a deterrent threat of nuclear weapons against other peoples in foreign states, why can it not use a similar deterrent threat to crime, within it's borders?
[quote][p][bold]onlyonesimongarner[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]woolywords[/bold] wrote: Perhaps I should set out how my ideal system works... First conviction for burglary, 3 years but released after 12 months - with the balance served as a 2 year suspended sentence. However, should you commit a burglary within that period, your sentence is now 7 years, where you will serve the 2 years outstanding then 2/3rd's of the 7 year sentence (or 6 years 8 months). If you are ever convicted of a third burglary after this, you will serve the whole term of a 14 year sentence, with no prospect of parole or early release. There will be no allowances made for mitigation, early guilty pleas nor any lame excuse that you care to create, as the sentences will be well publicised. This, 3 Strike Rule, is intended to strike fear of imprisonment in the minds of those who choose to commit these crimes and show to the public that they will be protected.[/p][/quote]Too Sensible by Far Woolywords , and what about theHuman Rights????, after all they might be from a Broken home . I wonder if any of our wannabe politicians would dare support this kind of approach???[/p][/quote]They, the offender, have lost their chance to claim an infringement of their Human Rights, when they commit an offence and are then imprisoned. Article 8 of the Human Rights Act states that, 'The right to respect for your home....without interference or intrusion by others...' and I would argue that the State fails to protect the citizen against the offender, by not applying a prison term, of such severity, that it acts as a deterrent to crime. If the State is able to maintain a deterrent threat of nuclear weapons against other peoples in foreign states, why can it not use a similar deterrent threat to crime, within it's borders? woolywords
  • Score: 0

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