East Lancashire care claims bill could top £15m

NHS chiefs in East Lancashire have been left facing a potential £15million bill amid controversy over who pays care home fees for the elderly.

Lawyers have besieged NHS East Lancashire and NHS Blackburn with Darwen with nearly 540 claims so far lodged over care home fees paid out by local families from 2004 to March 2011.

And the figure could rise yet further, as a second deadline approaches for similar claims at the end of March.

It follows a review which was ordered by the NHS amid concerns that families were having to foot the bill for care homes when primary care trusts should have met the costs.

NHS East Lancs is fielding 412 enquiries – which could leave them with an estimated liability of £12million.

And NHS Blackburn with Darwen is facing 127 claims, which could result in possible payouts of £2.7million.

NHS Lancashire finance director David Wharfe said in a report: “Primary care trusts nationally have experienced significant increases in claims, many of which are via solicitors.”

Mr Wharfe estimates that the total cost to the NHS in Lancashire could be up to £37million, as nearly 2,050 claims are considered.

The deadline for claims from 2004 to March 2011 closed at the end of last September. And the deadline for April 2011 to March 2012 claims will be March 31.

Victoria Motley, who works for East Lancashire solicitors Forbes, said that the majority of continuing care claims revolved around dementia patients.

“The whole issue of who pays for care for the elderly is massive – whether it is social services or the NHS,” she said.

“But in the end it is still the taxpayer who funds this and there has been an ongoing struggle between them over who is responsible.”

One of the most disturbing issues is an increasing trend in employing healthcare assistants to perform tasks usually undertaken by registered nurses, she said.

This enabled providers to downgrade it from being considered ‘nursing care’ to a lower paid discipline.

“It is incredibly important that people who may qualify receive an assessment as quickly as possible,” she added.

Comments (3)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

9:32pm Wed 23 Jan 13

Sajdin says...

NHS shouldn't pay for the costs at all. Its the families, if the family decides to put relatives into a care home, then they should foot the bill.
NHS shouldn't pay for the costs at all. Its the families, if the family decides to put relatives into a care home, then they should foot the bill. Sajdin

7:00am Fri 25 Jan 13

jack daniels says...

Sajdin wrote:
NHS shouldn't pay for the costs at all. Its the families, if the family decides to put relatives into a care home, then they should foot the bill.
Oh dear sad jin. You got yourself upset at the replies and got them removed.
[quote][p][bold]Sajdin[/bold] wrote: NHS shouldn't pay for the costs at all. Its the families, if the family decides to put relatives into a care home, then they should foot the bill.[/p][/quote]Oh dear sad jin. You got yourself upset at the replies and got them removed. jack daniels

7:12am Fri 25 Jan 13

jack daniels says...

Sajdin wrote:
NHS shouldn't pay for the costs at all. Its the families, if the family decides to put relatives into a care home, then they should foot the bill.
If you'd actually read the article it would state that the majority of the cases are about people with dementia and this would be difficult for an average family to provide the skilled care at home, therefore requiring the need of a 'nursing home'.

Thanks to our wonderful welfare state we are able to provide this service to help maintain the safety of our most vulnerable in society.

Thus endeth the lesson.
[quote][p][bold]Sajdin[/bold] wrote: NHS shouldn't pay for the costs at all. Its the families, if the family decides to put relatives into a care home, then they should foot the bill.[/p][/quote]If you'd actually read the article it would state that the majority of the cases are about people with dementia and this would be difficult for an average family to provide the skilled care at home, therefore requiring the need of a 'nursing home'. Thanks to our wonderful welfare state we are able to provide this service to help maintain the safety of our most vulnerable in society. Thus endeth the lesson. jack daniels

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree