David Cameron visits Buckshaw Village during local election campaign tour

David Cameron in Buckshaw Village

David Cameron in Buckshaw Village

First published in News

THE PRIME Minister was hoping to ‘lay the foundations’ for the county elections during a visit yesterday to an under construction housing estate.

A day after visiting Hope Technology in Barnoldswick, David Cameron’s county election campaign took him to Buckshaw Village, near Chorley, where he helped workers lay bricks on a construction site.

The PM visited a Barratt Homes’ The Green development, where he met with the managing director of Barratt Manchester, Neil Goodwin, to discuss how Government schemes could help people get onto the property ladder.

Mr Cameron said that he was very impressed with Buckshaw Village and the many facilities it has to offer.

Mr Goodwin said: "It was a pleasure to meet The Prime Minister today and show how schemes such as First Buy and Help to Buy have greatly assisted first time buyers.

“Barratt Manchester has sold over 200 homes under the First Buy scheme.”

Whilst at Buckshaw Village, Mr Cameron also met Amy and Neil Hudson, who have lived on the development since December. They bought their Barratt Home through First Buy.

Amy said: "We knew that this area was perfect for us due to the central location for work, and having the facilities here such as the school with its great Ofsted reports.”

Mr Cameron later met Chorley’s prospective parliamentary candidate Rob Loughenbury, who was selected for the seat in February.

Earlier this week labour leader Ed Miliband also visited Chorley as part of the party’s election campaign.

Comments (13)

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12:22pm Sat 27 Apr 13

chris283 says...

to little to late Cameron your party are going to get booted out of office read it and weep you clown
to little to late Cameron your party are going to get booted out of office read it and weep you clown chris283
  • Score: -3

2:35pm Sat 27 Apr 13

Kevin, Colne says...

For goodness sake when will journalists stop repeating without question statements from press releases? And start doing their job of exposing duplicity and falsehood, or at the very least pointing-out pitfalls that lurk in various schemes?

Perhaps the third paragraph of this piece should be re-written to read:

'... to discuss how Government schemes could help people pay the highest price possible for a house and thus boost the profits of housebuilders while idemnifying, in part, the lenders'.

If the government believes that providing a guarantee to lenders in order to protect financial institutions and maintaining high house prices is a valid economic policy for the nation then it should say so. Dressing up the scheme as an act of kindness to buyers is manifestly dishonest.

The root cause of our problem is that a large proportion of labour - workers - has lost pricing power. The effects of this are now working through the system and all sorts of ideas are being tried to paper-over the cracks.

I don't know what the answer is, but I'm darn sure that newspapers accepting without question press releases from corporate and vested interests is not serving their readership well.
For goodness sake when will journalists stop repeating without question statements from press releases? And start doing their job of exposing duplicity and falsehood, or at the very least pointing-out pitfalls that lurk in various schemes? Perhaps the third paragraph of this piece should be re-written to read: '... to discuss how Government schemes could help people pay the highest price possible for a house and thus boost the profits of housebuilders while idemnifying, in part, the lenders'. If the government believes that providing a guarantee to lenders in order to protect financial institutions and maintaining high house prices is a valid economic policy for the nation then it should say so. Dressing up the scheme as an act of kindness to buyers is manifestly dishonest. The root cause of our problem is that a large proportion of labour - workers - has lost pricing power. The effects of this are now working through the system and all sorts of ideas are being tried to paper-over the cracks. I don't know what the answer is, but I'm darn sure that newspapers accepting without question press releases from corporate and vested interests is not serving their readership well. Kevin, Colne
  • Score: 2

6:00pm Sat 27 Apr 13

Michael@ClitheroeSince58 says...

chris283 wrote:
to little to late Cameron your party are going to get booted out of office read it and weep you clown
You think so do you? As a hard working member of society I hear a different story from my fellow hard working mates.
[quote][p][bold]chris283[/bold] wrote: to little to late Cameron your party are going to get booted out of office read it and weep you clown[/p][/quote]You think so do you? As a hard working member of society I hear a different story from my fellow hard working mates. Michael@ClitheroeSince58
  • Score: 5

6:51pm Sat 27 Apr 13

Jack Herer says...

Kevin, Colne wrote:
For goodness sake when will journalists stop repeating without question statements from press releases? And start doing their job of exposing duplicity and falsehood, or at the very least pointing-out pitfalls that lurk in various schemes?

Perhaps the third paragraph of this piece should be re-written to read:

'... to discuss how Government schemes could help people pay the highest price possible for a house and thus boost the profits of housebuilders while idemnifying, in part, the lenders'.

If the government believes that providing a guarantee to lenders in order to protect financial institutions and maintaining high house prices is a valid economic policy for the nation then it should say so. Dressing up the scheme as an act of kindness to buyers is manifestly dishonest.

The root cause of our problem is that a large proportion of labour - workers - has lost pricing power. The effects of this are now working through the system and all sorts of ideas are being tried to paper-over the cracks.

I don't know what the answer is, but I'm darn sure that newspapers accepting without question press releases from corporate and vested interests is not serving their readership well.
Great, but yours is a massive conspiracy theory which, as normal with these nutty opinions, fail to explain how politicians such as Vince Cable happily go along with it.

Conspiracy theories like yours need people to suspend logic and reason to believe them.
[quote][p][bold]Kevin, Colne[/bold] wrote: For goodness sake when will journalists stop repeating without question statements from press releases? And start doing their job of exposing duplicity and falsehood, or at the very least pointing-out pitfalls that lurk in various schemes? Perhaps the third paragraph of this piece should be re-written to read: '... to discuss how Government schemes could help people pay the highest price possible for a house and thus boost the profits of housebuilders while idemnifying, in part, the lenders'. If the government believes that providing a guarantee to lenders in order to protect financial institutions and maintaining high house prices is a valid economic policy for the nation then it should say so. Dressing up the scheme as an act of kindness to buyers is manifestly dishonest. The root cause of our problem is that a large proportion of labour - workers - has lost pricing power. The effects of this are now working through the system and all sorts of ideas are being tried to paper-over the cracks. I don't know what the answer is, but I'm darn sure that newspapers accepting without question press releases from corporate and vested interests is not serving their readership well.[/p][/quote]Great, but yours is a massive conspiracy theory which, as normal with these nutty opinions, fail to explain how politicians such as Vince Cable happily go along with it. Conspiracy theories like yours need people to suspend logic and reason to believe them. Jack Herer
  • Score: -2

7:02pm Sat 27 Apr 13

Jack Herer says...

chris283 wrote:
to little to late Cameron your party are going to get booted out of office read it and weep you clown
We'll see. Politics is a strange game.

I may not agree with all the Tory policies at national level (when does anyone agree, wholesale, with a single parties policies?), but I know for certain that the Conservatives are a far better option for Britain than Labour, and certainly obviously UKIP - who are the BNP in a pin striped suit (not to mention a party who would happily sell out the British people to the likes of Murdoch).

In a situation where it is a two horse race between Labour and the Tories, then I'd have no qualms to say the Conservatives are by far the best option. That's if the interests of Britain should be taken into account over flagrant wastage of tax payers money.

I mean what is going on with Labour at the moment? In bed with the unions one minute - at loggerheads with them the next. Then best mates with George Galloway one day, his sworn enemy the next.

Does Ed Milliband actually have a clue? He certainly can't strike anyone as decent leadership material.

On a local level, I'm not sure how anyone can moan about the Conservatives. The electorate has an extremely simple choice there. Either sensible spending and looking out for the hard working man on the street from the Tories, or ever growing council tax bills to fund fat cats union mates, and huge wastage on stupid projects and schemes which no-one asked for or wants, from Labour.
[quote][p][bold]chris283[/bold] wrote: to little to late Cameron your party are going to get booted out of office read it and weep you clown[/p][/quote]We'll see. Politics is a strange game. I may not agree with all the Tory policies at national level (when does anyone agree, wholesale, with a single parties policies?), but I know for certain that the Conservatives are a far better option for Britain than Labour, and certainly obviously UKIP - who are the BNP in a pin striped suit (not to mention a party who would happily sell out the British people to the likes of Murdoch). In a situation where it is a two horse race between Labour and the Tories, then I'd have no qualms to say the Conservatives are by far the best option. That's if the interests of Britain should be taken into account over flagrant wastage of tax payers money. I mean what is going on with Labour at the moment? In bed with the unions one minute - at loggerheads with them the next. Then best mates with George Galloway one day, his sworn enemy the next. Does Ed Milliband actually have a clue? He certainly can't strike anyone as decent leadership material. On a local level, I'm not sure how anyone can moan about the Conservatives. The electorate has an extremely simple choice there. Either sensible spending and looking out for the hard working man on the street from the Tories, or ever growing council tax bills to fund fat cats union mates, and huge wastage on stupid projects and schemes which no-one asked for or wants, from Labour. Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

7:42pm Sat 27 Apr 13

happycyclist says...

And you'd have to pay me to live in Buckshaw village.
And you'd have to pay me to live in Buckshaw village. happycyclist
  • Score: 1

6:28am Sun 28 Apr 13

Kevin, Colne says...

Jack Herer wrote:
Kevin, Colne wrote:
For goodness sake when will journalists stop repeating without question statements from press releases? And start doing their job of exposing duplicity and falsehood, or at the very least pointing-out pitfalls that lurk in various schemes?

Perhaps the third paragraph of this piece should be re-written to read:

'... to discuss how Government schemes could help people pay the highest price possible for a house and thus boost the profits of housebuilders while idemnifying, in part, the lenders'.

If the government believes that providing a guarantee to lenders in order to protect financial institutions and maintaining high house prices is a valid economic policy for the nation then it should say so. Dressing up the scheme as an act of kindness to buyers is manifestly dishonest.

The root cause of our problem is that a large proportion of labour - workers - has lost pricing power. The effects of this are now working through the system and all sorts of ideas are being tried to paper-over the cracks.

I don't know what the answer is, but I'm darn sure that newspapers accepting without question press releases from corporate and vested interests is not serving their readership well.
Great, but yours is a massive conspiracy theory which, as normal with these nutty opinions, fail to explain how politicians such as Vince Cable happily go along with it.

Conspiracy theories like yours need people to suspend logic and reason to believe them.
I’m sure that some of my opinions are ‘nutty’ but I don’t subscribe to conspiracy theory. My view is that as a nation we get into situations through a combination of factors and moreover often by accident and unintended consequences rather than design or deliberate intent.

The modern-day process of generating news in the mainstream media is now a matter of public record but even as far back as 2004 the British Journalism Review carried an account from a young reporter using a pseudonym of his life on a local newspaper. His words, not mine, were: ‘Yet across local newspapers, regurgitating press releases and sticking a couple of opposing quotes on the end has become the norm’. It’s hard to imagine a more damning critique and I doubt that things have got any better in the last 10 years. That’s not to say that there’s a conspiracy; but there is something dreadfully amiss.

I am not suggesting that there was a golden age of journalism when the truth prevailed and other interests did not have influence, but it does appear that a combination of factors have led to a situation where modern journalism is now in large part a process of rapidly repackaging second-hand material, some of which is less than accurate or useful and a fair proportion is PR and propaganda from political and corporate interests masquerading as news.

This story in the LT has no attribution. Maybe the journalist at the LT is incredibly shy but if they had accompanied Prime Minister Cameron on his visit surely there would be a great deal more commentary to report. Moreover, they could have asked the Premier his response to the accusations that have been levelled against the various schemes for assisting house buyers. This would have enabled Mr Cameron to set-out counter arguments in support of the policy.

Reversing the logic of a prevailing argument - conventional wisdom or orthodoxy - is useful for reframing a problem or question and often reveals potential, alternative narratives or explanations. A different viewpoint arising from this process is not necessarily ‘nutty’. One is then left, of course, with assessing the validity of the differing standpoints.

The argument that large swathes of labour have lost bargaining power is by no means a theory of conspiracy. Globalisation, technology, weakening of trade union powers and the reconfiguration of the labour market has contributed to a situation where a great many workers have less bargaining power. This can be seen in the incomes of those workers which have been falling in real terms for some considerable period of time. While nominal wages have increased, the price of essentials has increased faster by a higher factor; and as far as one can judge this process has some way to run.

We are in a truly terrible predicament. The economy has stalled, private debt is still extremely large, public debt is continuing to rise, the balance of trade deficit is simply awful and we best pray that interest rates do not increase any-day soon otherwise our difficulties will become a great deal worse.

In the forgoing list the media has focused almost exclusively on the state of the economy, public debt and interest rates. Private debt has received some coverage, while the trade deficit passes largely unremarked.

Recently the media has been full of stories about inoculating children against measles. We'd do well to find some way of inoculating them against 'spin'.
[quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kevin, Colne[/bold] wrote: For goodness sake when will journalists stop repeating without question statements from press releases? And start doing their job of exposing duplicity and falsehood, or at the very least pointing-out pitfalls that lurk in various schemes? Perhaps the third paragraph of this piece should be re-written to read: '... to discuss how Government schemes could help people pay the highest price possible for a house and thus boost the profits of housebuilders while idemnifying, in part, the lenders'. If the government believes that providing a guarantee to lenders in order to protect financial institutions and maintaining high house prices is a valid economic policy for the nation then it should say so. Dressing up the scheme as an act of kindness to buyers is manifestly dishonest. The root cause of our problem is that a large proportion of labour - workers - has lost pricing power. The effects of this are now working through the system and all sorts of ideas are being tried to paper-over the cracks. I don't know what the answer is, but I'm darn sure that newspapers accepting without question press releases from corporate and vested interests is not serving their readership well.[/p][/quote]Great, but yours is a massive conspiracy theory which, as normal with these nutty opinions, fail to explain how politicians such as Vince Cable happily go along with it. Conspiracy theories like yours need people to suspend logic and reason to believe them.[/p][/quote]I’m sure that some of my opinions are ‘nutty’ but I don’t subscribe to conspiracy theory. My view is that as a nation we get into situations through a combination of factors and moreover often by accident and unintended consequences rather than design or deliberate intent. The modern-day process of generating news in the mainstream media is now a matter of public record but even as far back as 2004 the British Journalism Review carried an account from a young reporter using a pseudonym of his life on a local newspaper. His words, not mine, were: ‘Yet across local newspapers, regurgitating press releases and sticking a couple of opposing quotes on the end has become the norm’. It’s hard to imagine a more damning critique and I doubt that things have got any better in the last 10 years. That’s not to say that there’s a conspiracy; but there is something dreadfully amiss. I am not suggesting that there was a golden age of journalism when the truth prevailed and other interests did not have influence, but it does appear that a combination of factors have led to a situation where modern journalism is now in large part a process of rapidly repackaging second-hand material, some of which is less than accurate or useful and a fair proportion is PR and propaganda from political and corporate interests masquerading as news. This story in the LT has no attribution. Maybe the journalist at the LT is incredibly shy but if they had accompanied Prime Minister Cameron on his visit surely there would be a great deal more commentary to report. Moreover, they could have asked the Premier his response to the accusations that have been levelled against the various schemes for assisting house buyers. This would have enabled Mr Cameron to set-out counter arguments in support of the policy. Reversing the logic of a prevailing argument - conventional wisdom or orthodoxy - is useful for reframing a problem or question and often reveals potential, alternative narratives or explanations. A different viewpoint arising from this process is not necessarily ‘nutty’. One is then left, of course, with assessing the validity of the differing standpoints. The argument that large swathes of labour have lost bargaining power is by no means a theory of conspiracy. Globalisation, technology, weakening of trade union powers and the reconfiguration of the labour market has contributed to a situation where a great many workers have less bargaining power. This can be seen in the incomes of those workers which have been falling in real terms for some considerable period of time. While nominal wages have increased, the price of essentials has increased faster by a higher factor; and as far as one can judge this process has some way to run. We are in a truly terrible predicament. The economy has stalled, private debt is still extremely large, public debt is continuing to rise, the balance of trade deficit is simply awful and we best pray that interest rates do not increase any-day soon otherwise our difficulties will become a great deal worse. In the forgoing list the media has focused almost exclusively on the state of the economy, public debt and interest rates. Private debt has received some coverage, while the trade deficit passes largely unremarked. Recently the media has been full of stories about inoculating children against measles. We'd do well to find some way of inoculating them against 'spin'. Kevin, Colne
  • Score: 0

7:32am Sun 28 Apr 13

Kevin, Colne says...

Sorry, but one point that I failed to deal with was your question that my ‘nutty opinions’ failed to explain how politicians such as Vince Cable go along with it (help for home buyers).

Dr. Cable is a member of the Cabinet and as such is bound by the doctrine of collective responsibility. Over the years there have been numerous examples of Cabinet ministers supporting government policy in public, but later confessing to privately having serious doubts and in some cases being vehemently opposed to policy at the time. At the moment we must assume that Cable is fully in support of the policy.

There’s a terrific scene in ‘Yes Minister’ where Jim Hacker has to dash from his office to participate in a crucial government vote in the House. He asks Sir Humphrey Appleby what the official Party line is and when Sir Humphrey tries to explain the policy matter that is being voted upon Hacker retorts: “I don’t want to know what the issues are. I just don’t want to go through the wrong door.”

In my original posting yesterday I accused the government of being dishonest but less anyone think that this is a partisan view the accusation is one that can be levelled against the previous Labour administration. I recall having to explain to my children that they should ignore the ‘spin’ from the government that going to university would result in them getting a job, or a better job. Going to university is about trying to develop a trained mind. At the time this was not the prevailing view, but neither was it conspiracy or ‘nutty’. I have to say that our current travails have come as less of a shock to them than most of their contemporaries.
Sorry, but one point that I failed to deal with was your question that my ‘nutty opinions’ failed to explain how politicians such as Vince Cable go along with it (help for home buyers). Dr. Cable is a member of the Cabinet and as such is bound by the doctrine of collective responsibility. Over the years there have been numerous examples of Cabinet ministers supporting government policy in public, but later confessing to privately having serious doubts and in some cases being vehemently opposed to policy at the time. At the moment we must assume that Cable is fully in support of the policy. There’s a terrific scene in ‘Yes Minister’ where Jim Hacker has to dash from his office to participate in a crucial government vote in the House. He asks Sir Humphrey Appleby what the official Party line is and when Sir Humphrey tries to explain the policy matter that is being voted upon Hacker retorts: “I don’t want to know what the issues are. I just don’t want to go through the wrong door.” In my original posting yesterday I accused the government of being dishonest but less anyone think that this is a partisan view the accusation is one that can be levelled against the previous Labour administration. I recall having to explain to my children that they should ignore the ‘spin’ from the government that going to university would result in them getting a job, or a better job. Going to university is about trying to develop a trained mind. At the time this was not the prevailing view, but neither was it conspiracy or ‘nutty’. I have to say that our current travails have come as less of a shock to them than most of their contemporaries. Kevin, Colne
  • Score: 0

1:04pm Sun 28 Apr 13

Loving lances says...

How about visiting Shadsworth estate in Blackburn or some of the rubbish estates in Burnley and talking to decent residents plagued by addicts and dossers.
How about visiting Shadsworth estate in Blackburn or some of the rubbish estates in Burnley and talking to decent residents plagued by addicts and dossers. Loving lances
  • Score: 0

6:50pm Sun 28 Apr 13

Jack Herer says...

happycyclist wrote:
When are people going to give up on this 'hard-working man' cr@p? Sure, plenty of people earn their money, but plenty more don't give a **** about their job and certainly can't be described as 'hard-working'. They go to work, they do the minimum they can get away with, they get taxes deducted through PAYE because they've no choice, and they delude themselves that they're somehow better than everyone who hasn't got a job. People shouldn't be defined or judged simply because they have a job. Some people are ABSOLUTELY USELESS at their jobs.
I totally appreciate what you saying.

In an ideal world, indeed even if I just had more time, I'd be telling everyone to vote Lib Dem, full stop.

Unfortunately I have to be a realist, and, for me, that means accepting that Labour, and particularly UKIP, not getting in, is better than Lib Dems not winning outright. If that makes sense! I would hate to damage any work done by Lib Dem activists in the process, but these local elections won't damage the Lib Dems hopefully, especially after the Eastleigh triumph.

The thing is, I had a Labour leaflet through my door the other day which painted the Tories in such a skewed, spin driven light that it was obscene. As such I sometimes fight this with generalised statements myself.

Like I say though, I appreciate what you are saying on that front.
[quote][p][bold]happycyclist[/bold] wrote: When are people going to give up on this 'hard-working man' cr@p? Sure, plenty of people earn their money, but plenty more don't give a **** about their job and certainly can't be described as 'hard-working'. They go to work, they do the minimum they can get away with, they get taxes deducted through PAYE because they've no choice, and they delude themselves that they're somehow better than everyone who hasn't got a job. People shouldn't be defined or judged simply because they have a job. Some people are ABSOLUTELY USELESS at their jobs.[/p][/quote]I totally appreciate what you saying. In an ideal world, indeed even if I just had more time, I'd be telling everyone to vote Lib Dem, full stop. Unfortunately I have to be a realist, and, for me, that means accepting that Labour, and particularly UKIP, not getting in, is better than Lib Dems not winning outright. If that makes sense! I would hate to damage any work done by Lib Dem activists in the process, but these local elections won't damage the Lib Dems hopefully, especially after the Eastleigh triumph. The thing is, I had a Labour leaflet through my door the other day which painted the Tories in such a skewed, spin driven light that it was obscene. As such I sometimes fight this with generalised statements myself. Like I say though, I appreciate what you are saying on that front. Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

7:19pm Sun 28 Apr 13

Jack Herer says...

My former rant aside, I still think the local Tories do a decent job.

Jeez, snatched time for comments, I'm back and forth like a swing!
My former rant aside, I still think the local Tories do a decent job. Jeez, snatched time for comments, I'm back and forth like a swing! Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

10:41am Tue 30 Apr 13

simmo707 says...

BROKEN BRITAIN UNDER TORIES – MINDSET OF STILL BEING COLONIALISTS
Colonialism is the establishment, exploitation, maintenance, acquisition and expansion of colonies in one territory by people from another territory .The Tories have never strayed from this mentality since Gentlemen from Universities were groomed for the Colonial Office .Govenors and High Ranking Officials that oversaw the British Empire were Generations of the same mind-set .The Tory Mantra is and always will be “what’s theirs is mine and what’s mine is my own” .They treat the British Populace as if we were a Colonial Territory mixing cultures and races and keeping us on bare rations ,as long as they don’t have to mix .Only we suffer from Greed by wanting better conditions but not them .A leopard never changes its spots .It’s Government & Us created by Them. www.brokenbritainund
ertories.com
BROKEN BRITAIN UNDER TORIES – MINDSET OF STILL BEING COLONIALISTS Colonialism is the establishment, exploitation, maintenance, acquisition and expansion of colonies in one territory by people from another territory .The Tories have never strayed from this mentality since Gentlemen from Universities were groomed for the Colonial Office .Govenors and High Ranking Officials that oversaw the British Empire were Generations of the same mind-set .The Tory Mantra is and always will be “what’s theirs is mine and what’s mine is my own” .They treat the British Populace as if we were a Colonial Territory mixing cultures and races and keeping us on bare rations ,as long as they don’t have to mix .Only we suffer from Greed by wanting better conditions but not them .A leopard never changes its spots .It’s Government & Us created by Them. www.brokenbritainund ertories.com simmo707
  • Score: 0

4:42pm Tue 30 Apr 13

Loving lances says...

As a floating voter, last time I voted tory for the first time as a move against the Brownites. Now there is no party that I can support. So they can all drop dead for me.
As a floating voter, last time I voted tory for the first time as a move against the Brownites. Now there is no party that I can support. So they can all drop dead for me. Loving lances
  • Score: 0

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