Junk mail is making me feel my age

Since the beginning of the year there has been a bit of a – I think people call it a seachange – in the type of mail arriving at our door.

Not that bills have stopped dropping on the mat – sadly they’re still very much in evidence – but there’s been a lot more junk mail addressed to me. And it all follows a certain theme.

For instance, over the past couple of weeks I’ve received a brochure from Sun Life about a plan to ‘leave a fixed cash sum which could be used towards the cost of your funeral’, a letter from Life Line Screening about ‘a quick convenient way to check your risk of stroke, heart disease and osteoporosis’, an invitation to a seminar on ‘how you can protect your home and savings from care fees,’ a catalogue from Fifty Plus featuring fashion that 'fits your lifestyle' and a leaflet about making a will.

Is it any wonder I don’t have a spring in my step when I leave the house on a morning.

And it all started on January 31, the day I turned 50.

Overnight I turned into someone perceived to be at high risk of serious health problems and possibly death.

I became someone who needs to ditch the chinos and slide on some elasticated velour pants.

And I now need to have a funeral plan firmly in place.

It is all so depressing. Yet this is the time of my life when I should be happier than ever before.

According to a report, the secret of true happiness is as simple as reaching 50.

Researchers found that many people who passed the landmark were ‘comfortable and content’, having paid off their mortgage, built a solid relationship, established themselves in their career and raised a family.

At 50, they had time to enjoy life, travel and take up new activities.

The over-50s are also healthier than ever, and expected to live longer.

So why does my mail make me feel like I’m on the downhill slope to the crematorium?

If what I read about the over-50s is to be believed, I should be getting brochures for exotic holiday destinations, leaflets about new, exciting activities such as skydiving and free running, and details as to where I can invest my hard-earned cash.

What is worrying is that someone out there in this Big Brother world obviously knows that I don’t fit that profile.

They know that I’m plagued with aches and pains, have lost pride in my appearance, still have a huge mortgage and can’t afford to retire until I’m at least 80.

They are exploiting the fact that, for me, things can only get worse.

Comments (2)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

9:23pm Mon 3 Oct 11

Heretical says...

With respect Helen.....if your column is to be believed and you're not just 'writing' then you have a continuing theme.That theme is your constant (so it seems) discontent and upset with yourself and your life.
May I suggest you go and talk to someone about this because you are increasingly coming across as someone who has depression which is unrelieved by time.....
With respect Helen.....if your column is to be believed and you're not just 'writing' then you have a continuing theme.That theme is your constant (so it seems) discontent and upset with yourself and your life. May I suggest you go and talk to someone about this because you are increasingly coming across as someone who has depression which is unrelieved by time..... Heretical

10:30am Tue 4 Oct 11

Kevin, Colne says...

Helen,

It's time to 'break the chains', as Gerald Celenete would say; and not just in regard to junk mail.

The way to reduce named junk mail to a minimum is to ensure that your name on the electroral register is not in the 'edited version' copies of which are sold to commercial organisations.

When you complete forms for products, services etc. always tick the box to refuse mailing of marketing material.

Finally, register with the Mailing Preference Service.

If you do receive named unsolicited mail do not open it but write on the front: 'Unsolicited mail, return to sender. Return postage will be paid by original sender.' and post it in a Royal Mail post box.

Remember that insurance products and services offered with 'guaranteed acceptance' is another way of saying they'll accept everyone. Some of these products are promoted by former television personalities and often come with the offer of a 'valuable' free gift. If they are offering the inducement of a pen or vouchers to take the product then treat the product as being better for the supplier than the customer.

I hope you will not mind my saying but you of all people should know that stories in the press need to be treated with the utmost caution. A large proportion of stories should be read for entertainment not education.

Finally, in regard to 'where I can invest my hard-earned cash' you will not make progress unless and until you 'break the chains'. Those who are able to do so can take it 'in-house', in other words they become their own financial adviser. Once a person remove the charlatans - banks, building societies and insurers - from managing their money they'll be tipping the scales in their favour.

Kevin
Helen, It's time to 'break the chains', as Gerald Celenete would say; and not just in regard to junk mail. The way to reduce named junk mail to a minimum is to ensure that your name on the electroral register is not in the 'edited version' copies of which are sold to commercial organisations. When you complete forms for products, services etc. always tick the box to refuse mailing of marketing material. Finally, register with the Mailing Preference Service. If you do receive named unsolicited mail do not open it but write on the front: 'Unsolicited mail, return to sender. Return postage will be paid by original sender.' and post it in a Royal Mail post box. Remember that insurance products and services offered with 'guaranteed acceptance' is another way of saying they'll accept everyone. Some of these products are promoted by former television personalities and often come with the offer of a 'valuable' free gift. If they are offering the inducement of a pen or vouchers to take the product then treat the product as being better for the supplier than the customer. I hope you will not mind my saying but you of all people should know that stories in the press need to be treated with the utmost caution. A large proportion of stories should be read for entertainment not education. Finally, in regard to 'where I can invest my hard-earned cash' you will not make progress unless and until you 'break the chains'. Those who are able to do so can take it 'in-house', in other words they become their own financial adviser. Once a person remove the charlatans - banks, building societies and insurers - from managing their money they'll be tipping the scales in their favour. Kevin Kevin, Colne

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree